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  • Sad Day For Bay Port Alumn

    Posted by Mike DuBord

    Green Bay area soldier killed in action

    Bay Port grad died in Afghanistan

    Updated: Monday, 28 Mar 2011, 8:36 AM CDT
    Published : Sunday, 27 Mar 2011, 10:52 AM CDT

    HOWARD - A Green Bay area soldier has died in the line of duty.

    The Department of Defense says 22-year-old Specialist Justin Ross of Howard was killed Saturday  in Afghanistan.
     
    According to the DOD, Ross served with the 863rd engineer battalion based in Wausau.

    A representative at New Freedom Church in Howard tells FOX 11 that the U.S. Army contacted Pastor Ron Ross this weekend telling him that his son died.

    “Even before he graduated high school he was talking about going into the military,” said Gerald Heins, the assistant pastor at New Freedom.

    Ross graduated from Bay Port High School in Howard in 2007. Shortly after, he joined the U.S. Army.

    Last summer, Ross was deployed to Afghanistan for his first tour of duty overseas.

    “He was just a wonderful young guy,” said Heins. “He was private. He didn't spend a lot of time with people that weren't really close to him so he had a few very close friends and his family, but he was always a very good man.”

    Heins says Pastor Ron Ross and his wife Debbie flew to Dover Air Force Base Sunday morning for the return of their son's body.

    Before leaving, Pastor Ross wrote on his Facebook page, "We thank God for freedom and all those... who have paid the ultimate price. We are proud of you Justin!"

    “Being this soon into the grieving process you are still in shock,” said Heins. “You are still trying to make sense of it, trying to understand what happened.”

    Heins says the church and its members don't know many details of Ross's passing. He says Ross will be remembered as a wonderful man who was proud to serve his country.

    “From what I understand he really enjoyed it,” said Heins. “He loved the guys from his squad and he enjoyed the process and the idea of being able to defend his country.”

    The Department of Defense says Ross died of wounds he suffered when his unit was attacked by small arms fire.

    Dates and times for Ross's funeral are still being finalized, but New Freedom Church says services will be held at First Assembly of God on Green Bay's west side.

  • Snow Storm "Francesca" Packs a BIG PUNCH!

    Posted by Mike DuBord

    Self to Mother Nature..."Really? REALLY???"

    The calendar says it's Spring. Someone needs to tell Mother Nature that. The official count from "Snow Storm Francesca"...17.3 INCHES! In my hometown of Escanaba, you know, in the U.P. where storms like this are a regular occurence, the total snow count was...ZERO!

  • Green Bay is Left a Town With a Title but No Team

    Posted by Mike DuBord

    The N.F.L. lockout and the threat of a canceled 2011 football season have disquieted fans in many American cities, but the unease in Green Bay (population 102,000) is profound and multilayered. In the league’s smallest market, the Green Bay Packers not only give the region a cherished identity and an annual economic boost of more than $280 million, they are also the N.F.L.’s only community-owned franchise, with more than 112,000 shareholders.

    Mike Roemer for The New York Times

    As fans and shareholders, some Green Bay residents are in a quandary during the lockout.

    Absent the classic notion of an owner, the folks in Green Bay cannot get particularly angry at either side, especially since every neighborhood, workplace or family could have both season-ticket holders and shareholders.

    And the players? They just delivered the city a championship. In Green Bay, a prolonged Super Bowl party was just getting started.

    Finally, the N.F.L. lockout adds one more labor debate to a state consumed by a bitter brawl over public-employee unions, pension and health insurance benefits and widening budget gaps — a battle temporarily suspended March 11 when Gov. Scott Walker signed into law a bill limiting bargaining rights for most government workers. (On Friday, a Wisconsin judge issued a temporary restraining order that will prevent the law from taking effect, for now.)

    “What a bad month,” Ned Dorff, a Green Bay alderman on the City Council, said Wednesday. “As one of my friends told me, ‘I’ll never forgive the N.F.L. and Scott Walker for killing my Super Bowl buzz.’ ”

    In this environment, scores of Packers fans did what they customarily do in good times and bad: They made a pilgrimage to Lambeau Field, home of their beloved Packers for the last 54 years. By the dozens they came to take stadium tours. Some, including a busload of conventioneers from Iowa, came to pose for pictures in front of the nearly 20-foot-high statue of Vince Lombardi, which faces the main thoroughfare, Lombardi Avenue. And Wayne Guetschow, a meat cutter from Shawano — the Packers name comes from a meatpacking plant that sponsored the team in 1919 — came to pay for his four 2011 season tickets.

    Guetschow is one of the 99.7 percent who will renew their season tickets by the March 31 deadline, according to the team. The renewal rate has not changed in decades, not with a waiting list of 83,000.

    “One of the first things that came up in my divorce was my season tickets,” said Guetschow, who lives about an hour from Green Bay. “I made sure I held on to them.”

    Guetschow says he wears a Packers hat every day to work, where the N.F.L. lockout comes up in conversation several times during each shift.

    “It makes everybody really sad; I hear a lot of grumbling,” he said, wearing a hat and a sweatshirt celebrating the recent Super Bowl championship. “I don’t know what we will do with ourselves if there is no season or even no training camp. There will be more hunting, I guess. But people around here, it’s not like we’re all going to start golfing.

    “We’re a small, quiet place, but if there’s one thing that unites us, it’s the Packers. They make us feel bigger.”

    Three floors up from where Guetschow paid for his tickets, inside the Packers administrative offices, Mark Murphy, the team’s president and chief executive, said many planned events had been postponed because of the lockout.

    The Packers, for example, have yet to accept an invitation to the White House, since team leaders did not think President Obama would want to welcome only Packers executives and coaches. They have not ordered their Super Bowl rings because they want to consult with the players, whom they are prohibited from contacting during the lockout. Spring and summer are traditionally the seasons when Packers players make dozens of appearances at schools and at fund-raising charity events, but not this year.

    “I’m sure the players aren’t happy about that, either,” said Jason Wied, the team’s vice president for administration and its general counsel. “It’s certainly not helping schools or charities, especially after a Super Bowl victory.”

    Murphy, who had participated in the recent talks between league representatives and the players union, said the Packers were trying to keep their fans informed and connected during the lockout.

    “They realize that nobody from the Packers is going to personally benefit,” he said. “Our purpose all along is to do what’s right for the long-term health of the franchise. That’s our mission: serving millions of Packers fans and more than 112,000 shareholders.”

    Since 1923, when the Packers sold 1,000 shares of stock for $5 each, the team has been community-owned. The last stock sale was in 1997-98, when more than 120,000 shares were sold at $200 each during a 17-week period.

    Shareholders live in the 50 states and several countries. A 44-member board of directors, which includes former players, local business leaders and fans, oversees the Packers. A share of stock comes with voting rights but cannot be resold except back to the team for a fraction of its original price. No dividends are paid and the share cannot appreciate in value. It does not come with season-ticket privileges and no one can own more than 200,000 shares, to ensure that no individual can assume control of the team.

    Still, the annual shareholders meeting is so big it must be held at Lambeau Field, which seats about 73,000.

  • One Of The Best Recipe's In My Recipe Box!

    Posted by Mike DuBord

    Spinach Ravioli Bake

    My Wife & Kids love this dish but over the weekend I made a variation of it, using a home made Alfredo Sauce. DELICIOSO!!! Look how simple this is.

    Ingredients

    • 2 cups home made spaghetti sauce
    • 1 package (25 ounces) frozen sausage ravioli or ravioli of your choice
    • 2 cups (8 ounces) shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese
    • 1 package (10 ounces) frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry
    • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

    Directions

    • Place 1 cup spaghetti sauce in a greased shallow 2-qt. baking dish. Top with half of the ravioli, mozzarella cheese, spinach and Parmesan cheese. Repeat layers.
    • Bake, uncovered, at 350° for 40-45 minutes or until heated through and cheese is melted. Yield: 4-6 servings.


  • Is Gov. Walker Doing The Right Thing?

    Posted by Mike DuBord
    Wisconsin capitol building rotunda

    The rotunda of the Wisconsin State Capitol in Madison, WI

    MADISON, Wis. (WTAQ) - State Senate President Mike Ellis said Tuesday his house has enough votes to approve the governor’s cutbacks for union employee benefits and bargaining.

    Ellis, a Republican from Neenah, told one media outlet he wished there was an alternative which doesn’t go as far. But he said it was Walker who “set this menu,” and most senators support the governor’s plan as is.

    Assembly Republicans say they’re confident they have the 50 votes to endorse the measure. But 8 Assembly Republicans can jump ship and it would still pass – while in the Senate, only 3 GOP opponents would have been needed to derail the measure, assuming all the minority Democrats vote no.

    Ellis said he would go along with the package – which forces public union workers to pay more for their health insurance and pensions. It also limits bargaining to pay raises at or below inflation.

    Local police and fire officers are exempt from the bill. Walker says the only other option is to lay off 1,500 state employees now, and 6,000 in the next budget period that starts in July.

    Ellis said the state is broke and, “We don’t want to lay off almost 20,000 people.” Union employees and their supporters are trying to get GOP lawmakers to change their minds at a public hearing at the Capitol Tuesday.

    There have been protest rallies in small schools and large public settings – and a major rally was set for the noon hour Tuesday in Madison.

    Unions and other critics say the bill ends 50 years of labor peace in Wisconsin government – and it’s an assault on middle class employ

  • Valentines Gift To My Wife?

    Posted by Mike DuBord


    This was one of the gifts Tammy got ...New York Style Cheesecake

     

    Read more about it at www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,196,145188-231192,00.html
    Content Copyright © 2011 Cooks.com - All rights reserved.
    1 c. graham cracker crumbs
    3/4 c. sugar
    1/4 c. plus 2 tbsp. butter, melted
    1 1/2 c. sour cream
    2 eggs
    2 tsp. vanilla
    1 lb. cream cheese, broken into sm. pieces
    Blend graham crackers, 1/4 cup sugar and 1/4 cup melted butter, and line the bottom of an 8- or 9-inch ungreased spring-form pan.

    Blend sour cream, 1/2 cup sugar, eggs and vanilla in a food blender for 1 minute. Add cream cheese. Blend until smooth. Pour 2 tablespoons melted butter through top of blender. Pour into pan. Bake at 325 degrees for 45 minutes. Refrigerate for at least 4 hours before cutting. Serves 8 to 12.

  • Coach McCarthy Is One Smart Fella

    Posted by Mike DuBord

    He sat in a private office adjacent to a nearly emptied locker room, surrounded by his past, present and future. Two hours after he had hoisted the Lombardi Trophy amid red, white, blue and silver confetti swirling above him at Cowboys Stadium on Sunday night, Green Bay Packers coach Mike McCarthy reflected on a life’s journey that took him from humble beginnings in Steeltown to an enduring immortality in Titletown.

    Soaking up the aftermath of the Pack’s 31-25 victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers in Super Bowl XLV, McCarthy looked at his parents, Joe and Ellen, his wife, Jessica, and his daughter, Alex, and shook his head back and forth like a man humbled by the magnitude of his accomplishment.

    mcarthy, who grew up in Pittsburgh and is married to a Green Bay native, coached the Packers to their first Super Bowl title since the 1996 season.
    (Matthew Emmons/US Presswire)

    “It’s a numbing sensation,” McCarthy said. “It feels great to share it with family, and to share it with the players. You’re so focused on the game, and it’s fourth-and-5 and the ball hits the turf, and it’s total chaos – they’re pulling you here and pushing you there and you can’t get any air.

    “It’s definitely personal that it was against Pittsburgh, because that’s where I’m from. I was very blessed to grow up in a great football town, and now I’m fortunate enough to coach in the mecca of football. I’m married to a Green Bay native. It’s our home. And now, to be a permanent part of the tradition? Oh, man, it’s unreal.”

    If the reality of his team’s unlikely achievement hadn’t yet sunk in – winning a championship as a No. 6 seed after overcoming an unrelenting run of key injuries from start to finish – McCarthy couldn’t completely dodge the stamp Sunday’s game would leave upon his legacy. Chances are he will have a street named after him in the quaint Wisconsin city he plans to call home forever. That’s what happens to coaches who bring Super Bowl championships back to Green Bay, whether they’re living legends like Vince Lombardi, franchise revivers like Mike Holmgren or, as seems inevitable given Sunday’s outcome, deceptively brash catalysts like Michael John McCarthy.

    You want bold? In a move that would have made Rex Ryan proud, McCarthy dismissed his players from their final team meeting on the night before the game and had them fitted for Super Bowl rings. As their fingers were measured in a hallway at the Dallas-area hotel where they’d spent the week, the Packers couldn’t help but feel their coach’s swagger.

    “It gave us a subtle confidence,” said middle linebacker Desmond Bishop(notes), whose fumble recovery on the first play of the fourth quarter was one of the game’s pivotal moments. “It let us know that we’re right there on the cusp of going down in history, and it made us want it so badly.”

    McCarthy might have been crucified for his motivational ploy had the Steelers won the game, but the fifth-year coach wasn’t sweating it. “See, I don’t really think about those things,” he insisted. “I just care about what’s best for the team, and I really believed what I’d told them: That Super Bowl XLV was our time, that given the path we’d taken to get here we could handle anything Pittsburgh would throw at us. They’re a great, championship football team. But this is our time.”

    For the Packers, Super Sunday was the culmination of a three-year process that began after the team’s painful 2007 NFC championship game overtime defeat to the New York Giants at frigid Lambeau Field. That triggered the chain of events that led to the messy departure of quarterback Brett Favre(notes) as McCarthy and general manager Ted Thompson put their faith and career fortunes in the right arm of Aaron Rodgers(notes), the young backup who’d spent three tense years waiting to succeed a beloved Titletown icon.

    Had that gamble failed, McCarthy likely would have been forced to relocate by now. Instead, Rodgers burgeoned into a star and led the Packers on a three-game postseason tear through the NFC – and, on Sunday, past a Steelers team that boasted the NFL’s top defense in 2010.

  • Lombardi Trophy Comes Home

    Posted by Mike DuBord


    Packers Win! Forget Lombardi on Broadway. Green Bay has the newest Super Bowl hit: Aaron Rodgers.

    Capping one of the greatest postseasons for any quarterback, Rodgers led the Packers to their first NFL championship in 14 years on Sunday, 31-25 over the Pittsburgh Steelers. The Packers reclaimed the Vince Lombardi Trophy, named for their legendary coach who won the first two Super Bowls and is making his own star turn in New York these days in the play named after him.

     

    Current Top 5 Photos

    "It's what I dreamt about as a little kid watching Joe Montana and Steve Young," Rodgers said, "and we just won the Super Bowl."

    The Packers QB threw for three touchdowns, two to Greg Jennings, and the Packers (14-6) overcame even more injuries, building a 21-3 lead, then hanging on to become the second No. 6 seed to win the championship. Coincidentally, the 2005 Steelers were the other.

    Rodgers threw for 304 yards, including a 29-yard touchdown to Jordy Nelson, who had nine catches for 140 yards to make up for three big drops. Rodgers found Jennings, normally his favorite target, for 21- and 8-yard scores.

    Advertisement

    "Wow! It's a great day to be great, baby," Jennings said.

    Then the favored Packers held on as Pittsburgh (14-5) stormed back.

    "We've been a team that's overcome adversity all year," Jennings said, who noted injuries to Charles Woodson and Donald Driver. "Our head captain goes down, emotional in the locker room. Our No. 1 receiver goes down, more emotions are going, flying in the locker room. But we find a way to bottle it up and exert it all out here on the field."

    Few teams have been as resourceful as these Packers, who couldn't wait to touch the trophy honoring their greatest coach – and their title. Several of them kissed it as Cowboys great Roger Staubach walked through a line of green and gold.

    "Vince Lombardi is coming back to Green Bay," NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said as the silver prize was handed to the team.

    After sitting for three seasons, Rodgers took the Packers to two late-season victories just to make the playoffs as a wild card. Then he guided them to wins at Philadelphia, Atlanta and archrival Chicago before his biggest achievement – against a Pittsburgh team ranked second in defense.

    They barely survived a sensational rally by the Steelers, who still own the most Super Bowl rings – six in eight tries. But Pittsburgh failed to get its third championship in six years with quarterback Ben Roethlisberger. Roethlisberger's season began with a four-game suspension for violating the NFL's personal conduct policy. It ended with Roethlisberger standing on the sideline, his head down, hands on his hips, feeling something he never experienced: defeat in a Super Bowl.

    "I feel like I let the city of Pittsburgh down, the fans, my coaches and my teammates," Roethlisberger said, "and it's not a good feeling."

    Not even a decidedly black-and-gold crowd, with Terrible Towels swirling throughout the $1.2 billion stadium, could make a difference for the mistake-prone Steelers. Their two biggest defensive stars – Defensive Player of the Year safety Troy Polamalu and outside linebacker James Harrison – were virtually invisible. The offense didn't seem to miss outstanding rookie center Maurkice Pouncey, who was out with an ankle injury, but Roethlisberger only occasionally made key plays until the second half.

    The biggest plays were left to Rodgers, Nick Collins with a 37-yard interception return for a TD, Jennings, Nelson, and the rest of the guys in green and gold. In the end, they gave coach Mike McCarthy his first Super Bowl victory against the team he rooted for while growing up in Pittsburgh. Besides Lombardi, Mike Holmgren won a title in 1997 with Favre.

    "This is a great group of men here, a lot of character," Rodgers said. "We went through a lot together."

    Even on Sunday, they did. Woodson went out late in the first half with a collarbone injury, a few plays after Driver was sidelined with an ankle problem.

    "It was very difficult to watch," Woodson said, "but it feels good now."

    Woodson saw the Steelers, who rallied from a 21-7 halftime hole against Baltimore three weeks ago, show the same resilience. A 37-yard catch and run by Antwaan Randle El – an almost forgotten figure during his return season with just 22 receptions – sparked a quick 77-yard drive. Hines Ward, the 2006 Super Bowl MVP, had 39 yards on three catches during the series, including an 8-yard TD when he completely fooled Jarrett Bush.

    A quick defensive stop and a 50-yard drive to Rashard Mendenhall's 8-yard touchdown run made it 21-17. But with Pittsburgh driving for perhaps its first lead of the game, Mendenhall was stripped at the Green Bay 33 by Clay Matthews – one of the few plays the All-Pro linebacker made. The Packers recovered, and Rodgers hit Jennings for 8 yards and the winning points.

    Pittsburgh's last gasp was on a 25-yard touchdown pass to Mike Wallace and a brilliant pitchout by Roethlisberger to Randle El for a 2-point conversion.

    Mason Crosby added a 23-yard field goal for the Packers and the Steelers had no more comebacks in them.

    "You play to be world champions," Matthews said, "and that's what we are today."

  • Another Great Story About The Real "America's Team" The Green Bay Packers!

    Posted by Mike DuBord

    Remember the movie, "Working Girl?" Vintage Melanie Griffith in all her vacuum-cleaning, high-heeled glory?

    Anyway, Griffith's Tess McGill resorts to identity theft to climb the corporate ladder. She junks her Staten Island accent, borrows her injured boss' Chanel outfits and helps engineer a huge radio network acquisition. But her best friend warns her: "Sometimes I sing and dance around the living room in my underwear. Doesn't make me Madonna. Never will."

    That's how I feel about the Dallas Cowboys. They can sing and dance around their $1.2 billion stadium all they want, but it doesn't make them "America's Team." Never will.

    And while I have a very soft spot for the Pittsburgh Steelers, they're not "America's Team," either. They're not even Pennsylvania's team.

    No, it's the Green Bay Packers. Has to be. And this just isn't me talking. Someone once asked the late, great NFL commissioner Pete Rozelle to name the best football city in the country. Rozelle didn't hesitate.

    "Green Bay," he said. "A small town. People owning their own football team. Rabid supporters."

    Exactly. The Packers are the only publicly owned major sports franchise in the country. No dividends are issued on the 4,750,937 shares held by the 112,158 shareholders. Instead, these people invest in the Packers out of football love, not profit. How American is that?

    They bailed the franchise out in 1923, 1935, 1950 and 1997. They pepper the team president and team general manager with questions, good ones, at the annual shareholders meeting. NFL commish Roger Goodell attended last July's event -- and got Q-and-A'd into submission by the football-savvy Packers owners.

    And, by the way, shareholders vote for the team's board of directors. Nothing against Steelers fans, but Packers followers do more than wave Terrible Towels. They influence team policy.

    Curly Lambeau and George Calhoun established the Packers' franchise in 1919. That's 14 years before Art Rooney Sr. purchased the then-named Pittsburgh Pirates. That's 23 years before Cowboys owner Jerry Jones was even born and 33 years before the Dallas Texans became the last NFL franchise to fail.

    Sorry, "America's Team" isn't supposed to fold.

    So the Packers have history on their side. First publicly owned NFL franchise. First NFL franchise to hire a gap-toothed Vince Lombardi as its head coach. First team to win the Super Bowl. First team to win two Super Bowls in a row. First team to have a Broadway play about its head coach. First team to make "frozen tundra" part of the football lexicon.

    The Packers are the ultimate American success story. They survived and now prosper in the smallest city in the league. They've won 12 NFL championships. Hmmm. Maybe that's why it's called the Lombardi Trophy, not the Jones or Rooney.

    Don't get me wrong. The Steelers and Cowboys have formidable trophy cases, too. But it took the Steelers 41 years to win their first championship. And the Cowboys franchise was still in diapers when Lombardi was beating the Kansas City Chiefs in Super Bowl I.

    Ever been to Lambeau Field? It's the Fenway Park of the NFL. It's perfect. It's also unpretentious.

    At JerryWorld you get The Art At Cowboys Stadium, including such exquisite pieces as "Unexpected Variable Configuration: A Work in Situ." At Lambeau, you get a hot brat, a cold beer and a chorus of "Go, Pack, Go" while smooshed next to some guy wearing a cheesehead and orange hunting overalls. You tell me what sounds like more fun.

    The most-watched show in the 2009 fall TV season was a Packers game. The second-most-watched show in cable history is a Packers game. Five of the top 20 most-watched shows in the fall of 2010 were Packers games.

    The real "America's Team" doesn't have professional cheerleaders or a domed stadium. (And to the Rooney family's credit, neither do the Steelers.) You go to a Packers game and you feel like you're at Army-Navy, Bama-Auburn, OU-Texas.

    I don't care how much merchandise they sell or how big their stadium is, the Cowboys aren't "America's Team." How can you be "America's Team" when just as many people are rooting against you as they are for you?

    Plus, the Cowboys aren't football relevant anymore. In the past 15 years they've won exactly two playoff games and appeared in zero NFC Championship Games. Compare that to the Steelers over the same period (14 wins, two Super Bowl wins, three conference titles) and the Packers (12 wins, one Super Bowl win, three conference titles).

    The Packers and Steelers are built for success. The Cowboys are built for melodrama and coaching turnover. And as it turns out, JerryWorld was built so the Packers and Steelers could play Super Bowl XLV there.

    So on behalf of the Packers, thank you, Jerry.

  • Updated School Closings 2/2/11

    Posted by Mike DuBord
    Algoma School District Kewaunee Closed Today 
    Berlin Area School District Green Lake Closed Today 
    Bethany Lutheran School Manitowoc Closed Today 
    Brillion Public Schools Calumet Closed Today 
    Campbellsport School District Fond du Lac Closed Today-Classes canceled Wednesday
    Chilton School District Calumet Closed Today- 
    De Pere School District Brown Delayed 2 hours- 
    Denmark School District Brown Closed Today- 
    Elkhart Lake -Glenbeulah School Dist. Sheboygan Closed Today- 
    First German Lutheran - Manitowoc Manitowoc Closed Today- 
    Fond du Lac School District Fond du Lac Closed Today- 
    Fox Valley Lutheran High School Outagamie Delayed 2 hours- 
    Freedom Area School District Outagamie Delayed 2 hours-No Morning Pre-School
    Gill-Tech Academy Outagamie Delayed 2 hours- 
    Green Lake School District Green Lake Closed Today- 
    Hilbert School District Calumet Closed Today- 
    Hortonville School District Outagamie Delayed 2 hours-No Morning 4 K
    Kaukauna Public & Parochial Outagamie Closed Today- 
    Kewaunee Public -Parochial Schools Kewaunee Closed Today- 
    Kiel Area School District Manitowoc Closed Today- 
    Kohler School District Sheboygan Closed Today- 
    Lakeland College-Sheboygan Sheboygan Closed Today- 
    Lakeshore Technical College Manitowoc Closed Today- 
    Luxemburg-Casco School District Kewaunee Closed Today- 
    Manitowoc Lutheran High School Manitowoc Closed Today- 
    Manitowoc Public School District Manitowoc Closed Today- 
    Marian University Fond du Lac Special Alert-Open 1 pm Wed
    Markesan District Schools Green Lake Closed Today- 
    Menasha Joint School District Winnebago Delayed 2 hours-No Morning 4K or Early Childhood
    Mishicot School District Manitowoc Closed Today- 
    Montello School District Marquette Closed Today- 
    Moraine Technical College Fond du Lac Closed Today- 
    Morrison Zion Lutheran School Brown Closed Today- 
    Neenah Joint School District Winnebago Delayed 2 hours- 
    New Holstein School District Calumet Closed Today- 
    North Fond du Lac School District Fond du Lac Closed Today- 
    Oakfield School District Fond du Lac Closed Today- 
    Omro School District Winnebago Closed Today- 
    Osh. Christian/Valley Christian HS Winnebago Closed Today- 
    Oshkosh School District Winnebago Closed Today- 
    Princeton Public & Parochial Schools Green Lake Closed Today- 
    Providence Academy - Green Bay Brown Closed Today- 
    Redeemer Lutheran School - Manitowoc Manitowoc Closed Today-3K, 4K & Pre-school closed
    Reedsville School District Manitowoc Closed Today- 
    Ripon School District Fond du Lac Closed Today- 
    Roncalli High School Manitowoc Closed Today-Freshman Registration Feb 9th
    Rosendale-Brandon Schools Fond du Lac Closed Today- 
    Sheboygan Falls School District Sheboygan Closed Today- 
    Shiocton School District Outagamie Delayed 2 hours- 
    Shirley Lutheran School Brown Closed Today- 
    Southern Door Schools Door Delayed 2 hours-No Morning 4 K
    St John Lutheran Manitowoc Manitowoc Closed Today- 
    Stockbridge School District Calumet Closed Today- 
    Syble Hopp School Brown Closed Today- 
    Two Rivers Public Schools Manitowoc Closed Today- 
    UW - Fond du Lac Fond du Lac Closed Today-meetings canceled
    UW - Sheboygan Sheboygan Closed Today- 
    UW-Fox Valley Winnebago Closed Today-Campus Open
    UW-Manitowoc Manitowoc Closed Today- 
    UW-Oshkosh Winnebago Closed Today-Campus Open
    Valders Area School District Manitowoc Closed Today- 
    Waupun School District Dodge Closed Today- 
    Wautoma Area School District Waushara Closed Today- 
    West De Pere School District Brown Delayed 2 hours-No 4 Year Old Kindergarten
    Weyauwega-Fremont School District Waupaca Delayed 2 hours- 
    Wild Rose School District Waushara Delayed 2 hours- 
    Winn Lutheran Academy Fond du Lac Closed Today- 
    Winneconne Community School District Winnebago Closed Today- 
    Wrightstown School District Brown Closed Today- 
    Wyldewood Christian School Winnebago Closed Today- 
  • List Of School Closings Today 2/2/11

    Posted by Mike DuBord
    Algoma School District Kewaunee Closed Today 
    Berlin Area School District Green Lake Closed Today 
    Bethany Lutheran School Manitowoc Closed Today 
    Brillion Public Schools Calumet Closed Today 
    Campbellsport School District Fond du Lac Closed Today-Classes canceled Wednesday
    De Pere School District Brown Delayed 2 hours- 
    Denmark School District Brown Closed Today- 
    Elkhart Lake -Glenbeulah School Dist. Sheboygan Closed Today- 
    First German Lutheran - Manitowoc Manitowoc Closed Today- 
    Fond du Lac School District Fond du Lac Closed Today- 
    Green Lake School District Green Lake Closed Today- 
    Hilbert School District Calumet Closed Today- 
    Kaukauna Public & Parochial Outagamie Closed Today- 
    Kewaunee Public -Parochial Schools Kewaunee Closed Today- 
    Kiel Area School District Manitowoc Closed Today- 
    Kohler School District Sheboygan Closed Today- 
    Lakeshore Technical College Manitowoc Closed Today- 
    Luxemburg-Casco School District Kewaunee Closed Today- 
    Manitowoc Lutheran High School Manitowoc Closed Today- 
    Manitowoc Public School District Manitowoc Closed Today- 
    Marian University Fond du Lac Special Alert-Open 1 pm Wed
    Markesan District Schools Green Lake Closed Today- 
    Mishicot School District Menominee Closed Today- 
    Montello School District Marquette Closed Today- 
    Moraine Technical College Fond du Lac Closed Today- 
    New Holstein School District Calumet Closed Today- 
    North Fond du Lac School District Fond du Lac Closed Today- 
    Oakfield School District Fond du Lac Closed Today- 
    Omro School District Winnebago Closed Today- 
    Osh. Christian/Valley Christian HS Winnebago Closed Today- 
    Oshkosh School District Winnebago Closed Today- 
    Princeton Public & Parochial Schools Green Lake Closed Today- 
    Reedsville School District Manitowoc Closed Today- 
    Ripon School District Fond du Lac Closed Today- 
    Roncalli High School Manitowoc Closed Today-Freshman Registration Feb 9th
    Rosendale-Brandon Schools Fond du Lac Closed Today- 
    Sheboygan Falls School District Sheboygan Closed Today- 
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  • Thee Greatest Story I've Seen In Regard To The Packers "NEED" For This Win!

    Posted by Mike DuBord

    You root for the Green Bay Packers in this Super Bowl because Steelers fans want their team to win but Packers fans need their team to win. They need it like air.

     

    The football stadium can fit 72 percent of the town inside of it. One in every 54,000 Chicagoans is a Bears' fan, but one in 1,900 Green Bay residents is a Packers' fan. It says "Titletown" on the city seal. The Packers are Green Bay and vice versa. Their very souls are dimpled pigskin.

     

    You root for the Packers in this Super Bowl because Green Bay is the last little town to keep its team. It's right.

    You root for the Packers in this Super Bowl because most of the hotels in Green Bay are sold out for the game. Yes, hotels in Green Bay are sold out for a game in Dallas. "I got people from all over the country coming to watch the game at my bar," says Jerry Fowler, who owns Stadium View, the biggest tavern in town. "Packers fans just have to watch with other Packers fans. ... Last time we were in a Super Bowl, I came to open up in the morning and I had 1,000 people waiting to get in. At 8 a.m. I turned the lock and ran for it."

    You root for the Packers in this Super Bowl because karma owes Brett Favre a very terrible Sunday for what he did to Packers fans; for what he did to the front office; for all the fake retirement press conferences and fake tears and fake posturing; for dragging Aaron Rodgers' career around through his own muddy whims. Rodgers deserved better and now he deserves this.

    You root for the Packers in this Super Bowl because Green Bay is the last little town to keep its team. You want it for Decatur, Ill., which lost its team to Chicago, and Portsmouth, Ohio, which lost its to Detroit, and Pottsville. Pa., which lost its to Boston. You root for the Packers for the same reason you root for Roberto Benigni to win the Oscar or Buster Douglas to win the fight. It's right.

     

    You root for the Packers in this Super Bowl because it's more than just Green Bay's football team. It's the blood in their veins and the asphalt under their tires. They drive down Lombardi Avenue. They speed down Holmgren Way. They park on Reggie White Way. They learn at Vince Lombardi Elementary and daydream of starring at Lambeau Field. And if they lose Sunday, there will be a line to jump off Ray Nitschke Bridge.

     

    You root for the Packers in this Super Bowl for guys like the one on PackerForum.com writing about hearing his mom shriek downstairs and thinking she's in trouble and running down to find her in her robe and slippers shrieking in delight at the man standing in the doorway, Packers god Bart Starr, who had stopped by to drop off some gifts as thanks for the guy cutting Starr's lawn and shoveling his sidewalk this year.

     

    You root for the Packers in this Super Bowl because being a Steelers fan is a sickness but being a Packers fan is incurable. In Green Bay, Packers gas up where you gas up, pray where you pray, eat where you eat. The players are like family, which means they get yelled at a lot. "That's the thing that's a little different here," says All-Pro Packers linebacker Clay Matthews. "If you mess up here, the lady at the grocery store will let you know."

     

    You root for the Packers in this Super Bowl because, at the end of it, they're not giving out the Noll Trophy, they're giving out the Lombardi Trophy. Nobody on Broadway is rushing to see the hit play Cowher, but they are rushing to see the hit play Lombardi. (Over the years, though, many have gone to the one about Troy Polamalu: Hair.)

     

    You root for the Packers in this Super Bowl because Packers fans took a taunt -- "You cheesehead!" -- and turned it into a gouda thing. In 1987, Ralph Bruno, while upholstering his mother's couch in Milwaukee, burned holes into one of the cushions, carved a hole for his head and painted it yellow. Thus, the Cheesehead product line was born. In Green Bay, you can also buy cheese top hats, cheese sombreros, cheese ties, cheese earrings, cheese footballs, cheese bricks, cheese beer cozies, cheese sunglasses, cheese flying discs and, naturally, cheese fezzes.

     

    Do they wear steel beams in Pittsburgh?

     

    You root for the Packers in this Super Bowl because if the Steelers left Pittsburgh there would still be the Penguins, who won the Stanley Cup in 2009, and the Pirates. True, they stink, but Albert Pujols visits all the time. If the Packers left, Green Bay's major attraction would be the L.H. Barkhausen Waterfowl Preserve. But some people would still take Packerland Drive to get there.

     

    You root for the Packers in this Super Bowl because every now and then the game needs to have on top the little team nobody can seem to hate.

     

    You root for the Packers in this Super Bowl because of Ouida Wright and her boyfriend, who never dreamed being homeless in Green Bay would be lucky. They were on the street when the Dallas Convention and Visitor's Bureau sent a "mystery" man out, waiting for someone to address him with the secret phrase: "Have you been to Dallas lately?" Wright heard about it, said it to the right guy and now she's going to the Big Bowl with her boyfriend. Hotel, tickets, flights--everything paid.

     

    Yes, when they come back to Green Bay from watching the Packers play in the Super Bowl, they still won't have anywhere to live.

     

    What's your point?